Drug Responses

Our new drug database has launched! Learn about drug-gene interactions for:

Drug Responses

Azathioprine (Thiopurine) Azathioprine is part of a group of drugs called thiopurines. These drugs are widely used to treat leukemias and autoimmune disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis) and arthritis. They are also used as immunosuppressants after organ transplantation.

Clopidogrel (Plavix) Clopidogrel is also called Plavix. It is a drug used by doctors to treat or prevent strokes and heart attacks. Clopidogrel works by preventing the blood from clotting so that it flows easier through the body. Clopidogrel is sometimes called a 'blood thinner'.

Mercaptopurine (Thiopurine) Mercaptopurine (6-mercaptopurine) is part of a group of drugs called thiopurines. These drugs are widely used to treat leukemias and autoimmune disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis) and arthritis. They are also used as immunosuppressants after organ transplantation.

Simvastatin (Zocor) Simvastatin is used together with diet, weight-loss, and exercise to reduce the amount of fatty substances such as low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol ('bad cholesterol') and triglycerides in the blood and to increase the amount of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol ('good cholesterol') in the blood.

Tegretol (Carbamazepine) Tegretol is a drug most often used to treat pain, epilepsy, and seizures. It is less commonly used to treat bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and other psychiatric disorders. Tegretol is also known as carbamazepine.

Thioguanine (Thiopurine) Thioguanine is part of a group of drugs called thiopurines. These drugs are widely used to treat leukemias and autoimmune disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis) and arthritis. They are also used as immunosuppressants after organ transplantation.

Warfarin (Coumaden) Warfarin is also called Coumaden. It is a drug used by doctors to treat or prevent blood clots, and is most often prescribed to those at risk of deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and stroke. Warfarin works by thinning the blood to keep it from clotting so that it flows easier through the body. Warfarin is sometimes called a 'blood thinner'.